IJBSPT 2018 Volume 5 Issue 1

International Journal BioSciences, Psychiatry and Technology (IJBSPT) ISSN: 0975-2161

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Analysis of Nurse Educators’ Experiences Using the Hudson Five Factor Model: Basis for a Proposed Mentoring Resource Material.  Christopher James M. Macario, Graduate School, Centro Escolar University, Philippines.  IJBSPT (2018), 5(1):1-11

DOI


Title:
Analysis of Nurse Educators’ Experiences Using the Hudson Five Factor Model: Basis for a Proposed Mentoring Resource Material

Authors & Affiliation:
Christopher James M. Macario, Graduate School, Centro Escolar University, Philippines
cmacario@ceu.edu.ph 

ABSTRACT:
There is a mix between the nursing practice and teaching profession. Transitioning nurse educators may be experts in advance and clinical practice but may lack the teaching literacy required to succeed as an educator. One main problem with transition is the lack of mentorship to connect the process together. Mentoring is a phenomenon not new to nurses, but the extent and value is not entirely understood. To better understand mentoring in nursing academe, this study used Hudson’s Mentoring Model. This model includes (a) the mentor’s personal attributes; (b) system requirements; (c) pedagogical knowledge; (d) modelling; and (e) feedback. This descriptive study analyzed the nurse educators’ mentoring experiences using questionnaire and interview based on Hudson’s Mentoring Model to better understand and suggest ways to improve mentoring in nursing academe through a mentoring resource material. Adopting the purposive sampling, the researcher involved 131 nurse educators who have experienced being mentored and have been teaching nursing subjects, 84 came from the private while 47 from the public institutions respectively. Findings revealed that the extent of mentoring experienced is at a moderate level. This suggests that mentoring may not be entirely understood in nursing academe. To reinforce professional and personal development, mentoring in nursing education must improve experiences approaches in teaching through well-designed lessons, adequate preparation, rational viewpoints and timely feedback. 

Keywords: Nurse Educators, Mentoring Resource Material, Mentoring Experience